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Top 25 bats of the Iberian Peninsula

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Top 25 bats of the Iberian Peninsula

Bats constitute a zoological group consisting of more than 900 species. Have you ever wondered which ones you can see in the Iberian Peninsula? Find out below.

The 25 bats of the Iberian Peninsula

Although it is true that at first glance it is difficult to appreciate the characteristics of bats and distinguish whether it is the same specimen that we have been able to see elsewhere in the country, we must bear in mind that it will not always be the same species. There are many that inhabit the peninsula.

Gender Rhinolophus

Rhinolophus ferrumequinum

Also known as “big horseshoe bat”. It can measure up to 71 mm long and weigh 34 grams. It is distributed throughout most of the peninsula. He takes refuge both in houses, as in mines and caves.

Rhinolophus hipposideros

Known as “small horseshoe bat”. It can measure up to 45 mm long and weigh 9 grams. It is a sedentary species, distributed throughout most of the peninsula, with preference for wooded territories or agricultural areas.

Rhinolophus euryate

Source: David Herrero González – Flickr

Known as “Mediterranean horseshoe bat”. It can measure up to 58 mm long and weigh 17 grams. He prefers warm areas, with abundant caves and wooded areas.

Rhinolophus mehelyi

Known as “medium horseshoe bat”. It can measure up to 64 mm long and weigh 18 grams. It is a sedentary species, located in olive groves and steppe areas of the southwest of Spain.

The 25 bats of the Iberian Peninsula: the genus Nyctalus

Nyctalus leisleri

Known as “small nodule.” It can measure up to 68 mm long and weigh 20 grams. It is a migratory species that prefers forest habitats.

Nyctalus Lasiopterus

Exemplary of a kind of chiroptera from Spain.
Source: Juntadeandalucia.es

Known as “giant nodule.” It can measure up to 104 mm long and weigh 76 grams. It is a migratory species that shows a preference for forest biotopes.

Nyctalus noctula

Known as “common nodule.” It can measure up to 82 mm long and weigh 40 grams. It is a migratory species that shows preference for hollow trees as a refuge.

Gender Myotis

Myotis daubentoni

spanish chiroptera
Source: Wikipedia

Known as “riverside bat.” It can measure up to 55 mm long and weigh 15 grams. He prefers riverside biotopes and in summer he takes refuge in the hollows of trees, in cracks, etc. In winter it is located in caves.

Myotis capaccinii

Known as “bigeye bat”. It can measure up to 53 mm long and weigh 15 grams. It is a sedentary species that shows a preference for biotopes linked to water courses. Their shelters are all kinds of caves.

Myotis mystacine

bats of the Iberian Peninsula
Source: Ján Svetlík – Flickr

Known as “mustache bat.” It can measure up to 48 mm long and weigh 8 grams. In summer he takes refuge in trees and cracks; in winter, in caves and chasms.

Myotis emarginatus

Known as “Geofrey’s bat.” It can measure up to 53 mm long and weigh 15 grams. Shows preference for biotopes linked to water courses and large tree cover. Their shelters are caves, cracks of buildings and lofts.

Myotis nattereri

Known as “Natherer bat.” It can measure up to 50 mm long and weigh 12 grams. Their shelters are caves, fissures and cracks.

Myotis bechsteinii

bats of the Iberian Peninsula
Source: Naturalista.mx

Known as “Bechstein bat.” It can measure up to 55 mm long and weigh 14 grams. He has a preference for wooded places, using them as a refuge.

Myotis myotis

Known as “big mouse bat.” It can measure up to 79 mm long and weigh 40 grams. It is one of the most common cave species, with preference for caves, mines and tunnels.

Myotis blythii

Known as “medium-sized mouse bat.” It can measure up to 71 mm long and weigh 28 grams. It is present in wooded and humanized areas, such as parks and gardens.

The 25 bats of the Iberian Peninsula: the genre Pipistrellus

Pipistrellus pipistrellus

bats of the Iberian Peninsula
Source: Malaga.es

Known as “common bat”, it is located throughout the peninsula. It can measure up to 51 mm long and weigh 8 grams. It is a very ubiquitous and urban species.

Pipistrellus nathusii

Known as “bat of Nathusius.” It can measure up to 55 mm long and weigh 15 grams. Shows preference for occupying tree hollows and human constructions. In Spain its presence is purely seasonal.

Pipistrellus Kuhlii

Pipistrellus kuhlii: bats of the Iberian Peninsula
Source: Wikipedia

Known as “light-edged bat.” It can measure up to 47 mm long and weigh 10 grams. Shows preference for rural areas, using holes in human constructions.

Pipistrellus savii

Known as “mountain bat.” It can measure up to 54 mm long and weigh 15 grams. Its habitat is the mountainous valleys, where it uses the cracks to hide, or the hollows of the trees.

Gender Plecotus

Plecotus auritus

Plecotus: bats of the Iberian Peninsula
Source: Wikipedia

Known as “Northern Ears.” It can measure up to 53 mm long and weigh 11 grams. Show preference for cold climates. It is located, above all, in the Cantabrian coast.

Plecotus austriacus

Known as “southern ear.” It can measure up to 58 mm long and weigh 13 grams. It is of Mediterranean origin, but also present in the northwest of the peninsula. He takes refuge in caves, mines, tunnels and human buildings.

The 25 bats of the Iberian Peninsula: other genres

Tadarida teniotis

Known as “rabudo bat”. It can measure up to 92 mm long and weigh 18 grams. It is located in olive groves and steppe areas, throughout the peninsula.

Eptesicus serotinus

Known as «Hortelano bat». It can measure up to 82 mm long and weigh 33 grams. It occupies large areas, preferring orchards and lagoons, parks and gardens. He takes refuge in human constructions.

Barbastrella Basrbastrellus

bats of the Iberian Peninsula
Source: ReinoAnimalia.fandom.com

Known as “forest bat”. It can measure up to 58 mm long and weigh 13 grams. It shows preference for forested mountain regions, but also for human populations.

Miniopterus schreibersi

Known as cave bat. It can measure up to 62 mm long and weigh 16 grams. It is a migrant caveman species, with presence throughout the peninsula.

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