Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever: Origin | Breeds | Characteristics| Fun Facts

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever: Origin | Breeds | Characteristics| Fun Facts | How To Care | Health – Despite the long complex name, the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever, called “Toller” for short, is a simple and cunning dog. These dogs full of energy are the representatives of a breed that is rarely encountered, but which thanks to the intelligence and elegance that distinguish it has a large circle of fans.

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever

This breed is of medium size: a specimen weighs on average from 17 to 23 kg, reaches 51 cm in height at the withers and usually the males are larger and heavier than the females. Of the six members of the Retriever family, which also includes the most popular Labrador Retrievers andGolden Retrievers, this is the smallest breed and are often confused with Golden Retrievers. With careful observation, however, it can be seen that the Toller is quicker and more agile than its bigger cousin. Its double coat is suitable for water: the coat is soft and of medium length and the undercoat, even softer and thicker, is waterproof and therefore also perfect for swimming in cold water.

Like a fox

At the throat, ears, tail and back of the legs, the hair is longer and forms a sort of decoration on the coat of the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever. The color of the hair varies from orange-red to a more intense red and is often interspersed with white spots on the legs, chest, forehead and on the tip of the tail. The Toller is generally very lively and, as you will discover as you continue reading,

Skilled hunter

The name of this breed suggests its origin and its use in ancient times. The translation of Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever could in fact be “Nova Scotia duck luring retriever”. Nova Scotia is a peninsula east of Canada where the Toller has been recognized as the country’s official dog. This is where it was first used for duck hunting. In this type of hunting the dog has a specific task: the hunter from his hiding place throws sticks on the river bank, his four-legged companion catches them and brings them back, attracting with his playful movements and bright colors the water birds towards the shore, within range of the hunter. At that point the man whistles to call his dog and shoots the ducks. Finally, as a good Retriever, the Toller brings the ducks to the hunter. This type of hunting is also called “Tolling”.

From Canada to Sweden

In the 19th century, this Canadian-born breed was especially popular in Canada and the United States. It is unclear how it originated, but it is likely the fruit of various attempts to breed dogs that can play and attract ducks close to the shore such as foxes. The native inhabitants of Nova Scotia already hunted wild ducks in this way with the help of red dogs. Taking a cue from the natives, the settlers likely crossed Indian red dogs with Collies, Spaniels, and Setters. Only towards the end of the 19th century did the breed arrive in Europe, in 1880 in Denmark and in 1884 in Sweden. However, the dogs were still called by other names at the time, such as “Little River Duck Dog”. The Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever was registered as an official breed by the Canadian Kennel Club relatively recently, in 1946. The first international recognition instead received it in the early eighties from the FCI (Fédération Cynologique Internationale), the world’s largest association of canine breeders. This playful four-legged friend has many fans especially in Sweden, where more representatives of this breed live than in Canada.

A playful character

The Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever would play all day. He is a cheerful and very attentive dog, always ready to carry out the next task that is entrusted to him. Retrieving, in water or on land, is a great passion of his. This breed is also very intelligent, docile and with its people of reference it is loyal and affectionate. His behavior towards strangers can range from disinterested to withdrawn. It is not aggressive, but defends its territory by barking. This charming playful boy does not tend to wander.

Choose a good kennel to have a healthy dog

A Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever can live to be around 15 years, often maintaining a very active temperament even in old age. The breed is generally of robust constitution, but eye diseases may occur as well asdysplasias in the hips and elbows. When purchasing a Toller, check that its parents have undergone adequate preventive tests, which are the best prevention for hereditary diseases. Sight diseases, for which Tollers are predisposed, can also be avoided with modern genetic testing. Another condition that often occurs in these dogs is SRMA (Meningitis-Arthritis). Again it appears that it is a hereditary disease. Symptoms are sudden fever, stiffening of the body and inability to move. Cortisone therapy can lead to rapid relief, but it must be continued for months to defeat this disease which can become chronic.

Race or crossbreed?

Those who are passionate about Toller have already come across the heated debate about “race vs. crossbreeds ”, born following some studies that have shown that in the Retriever breed on a world scale there is a high percentage of reproduction between relatives (26 percent), higher than the percentage of siblings with the same parents. Some breeders and most associations, even in Canada, insist on breeding purebred dogs, but some consider it a “torture breeding” practice to mate animals that have a very similar genetic background and that could lead to I risk subsequent generations. Some breeders try to reduce this risk by crossbreeding with other breeds. Advocates of purebred dogs should at least make a calculation of the coefficient of inbreeding in animals intended for mating and know their pedigree to ensure that future parents of a Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever litter are as genetically and genetically distant as possible. that a low degree of kinship is maintained. The coefficient of inbreeding could soon be replaced by molecular genetic methods to know the transmission of kinship. In this breed, knowing the genetic heritage is very important for breeders, regardless of their side in this debate. mating and learning about their genealogy to ensure that future parents of a Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever litter are as far genetically as possible and that a low degree of kinship is maintained. The coefficient of inbreeding could soon be replaced by molecular genetic methods to know the transmission of kinship. In this breed, knowing the genetic heritage is very important for breeders, regardless of their side in this debate. mating and learning about their genealogy to ensure that future parents of a Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever litter are as far genetically as possible and that a low degree of kinship is maintained. The coefficient of inbreeding could soon be replaced by molecular genetic methods to know the transmission of kinship. In this breed, knowing the genetic heritage is very important for breeders, regardless of their side in this debate.

The coat care of the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever

The smooth and water-repellent coat of the Toller does not need great care, just a few brushes a week and occasionally untangling or combing the long hairs that cover the legs and ears. In general, the Toller is not a dog for cleaning fanatics, also because of his love of water: mud pools are a passion for these red elves who can’t resist them. The Toller sheds a lot of hair especially during moulting, so it is a good habit to comb it often during this period to stem hair loss in the house.

Education: a model student

Anyone who has chosen to live with a Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever usually has a dog with a great “Will to please”, ie the desire to please the owner. It is a great advantage for the education of the dog, who enjoys following orders. Even someone who is not very experienced with dogs can teach a Toller to be obedient as long as they know the basic vocabulary of the dog language and have perseverance. This crafty dog ​​also enjoys learning tricks. Consistently and without needing to be strict, the Toller is therefore easy to educate. The ideal would be to take him to a training center as a puppy.

Play, fun and relax

Although no longer used for duck hunting, the Toller loves swimming, fetching and of course the combination of the two. He also enjoys everything that requires perseverance and intelligence: this breed is suitable for dog sports such as Agility, Dog Dancing and Flyball, but also as a search dog. An adult Toller will gladly accompany you on a bicycle, jogging or challenging walks in the woods. However, care must be taken not to raise an adrenaline-dependent dog, who always needs to move and cannot feel comfortable. Give importance to the hours of rest right from the start. A balanced Toller can occasionally enjoy a lazy afternoon in his ownkennel. This highly intelligent sports ace gives its best in head and, above all, nose training. It can become the perfect companion for active and nature-loving people, who do not necessarily want to play sports with their dog every day.

Is the Toller the right dog for me?

This breed seeks the bond with the pack and is absolutely suitable for family life, as long as there are active people among its members. If you’re a stay-at-home, this red pixie will find a way to keep himself busy on his own, with unpleasant twists. In principle, even beginners with dogs can get by with a Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever. In any case, we suggest that you learn about the activities for him and his training, to channel the incredible energy of the Toller in the right way even as a puppy. Other animals can also live in the house, because it is a breed that usually socializes easily: with a Toller, dog-cat coexistence can work.

Before your arrival, find out if there are allergic family members and how to organize your care during holidays or in case of illness. Tip: Animal lovers who like to travel with their dog have plenty of options and a well-trained Toller is a welcome guest in many hotels.

The breed generally maintains its vitality and the desire to play even in old age, a factor that must be taken into consideration before your four-legged friend arrives in the house. Of course, like all dogs, he will need the basic accessories like leashes, dog brushes, blankets, car safety accessories, bowls and toys. Among the various expenses, those for quality nutrition and visits to the veterinarian must also be calculated and planned, as well as some extra expenses for any medical treatment in case of sudden illness.

Where to find the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever of my dreams

The decision is made: soon you will welcome a Toller into the family. Now is the time to go in search of the right one for you! Before you start looking for a good breeder, find out about the inbreeding coefficient of the breed, so you will know the different theories and you can form your own opinion on the subject. Visit the breeder to meet the parents of the litter and ask questions about the character and health of the dog breed in general as well as the puppy you will adopt. The breeder will also likely ask you a few questions: this is a good sign, it means that he wants to make sure that one of his puppies will be adopted by a suitable person. At the time of delivery, the little Toller must have with him the health certificate, the genealogical one and that of thedog vaccinations and generally also the microchip.

The wait for the Toller of your dreams is likely to be long: in fact, in some countries the breeding of this breed is only allowed if the breeder is part of specialized breed associations. Furthermore, before they can be used for breeding, dogs must pass various kinds of tests: the behavior test, hip and elbow tests, eye examination and tests to evaluate the ability to accompany, hunt or with the dog. dummy. Serious breeders also provide for socialization and health prevention and choose buyers with careful selection, to ensure their animals a happy life.

According to the opinion of the experts, for a healthy and suitable breeding for the breed, those who are not part of an association would not be suitable for the sale of puppies, because to breed Toler you need the knowledge of professionals and more love for animals than for the wallet. Breeders who carry out the business without these requirements do so mainly for profit, at the expense of the well-being of the puppies, as well as the health of their parents. We must not let ourselves be taken by compassion: every time you buy from these alleged breeders, you do nothing but increase the demand which, you know, regulates the supply.

If you want an adult Toller, consult the Internet: there are organizations for Retrievers in difficulty that deal with finding a family with dogs left alone, among which there is a Toller every now and then. Being a not very widespread breed, however, it is quite rare, as is finding a mestizo Toller or even a thoroughbred in a kennel.

We just have to wish you a lot of fun with your enterprising Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever!

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